The Dermatology Center of Long Island

Dr. Joel L. Lamm

Board Certified Dermatologist

516-933-1717

The Dermatology Center of Long Island

Dr. Joel L. Lamm

Board Certified Dermatologist

516-933-1717

400 S. Oyster Bay Road
Hicksville, NY 11801

OFFICE OPENING BEGINNING MAY 18, 2020
Dr. Lamm will be available on Monday, Wednesday and Thursday afternoons.
Please call the office to schedule your appointment.
The receptionist will go over our safety procedures.

Skin Cancer

More than one million people are diagnosed with skin cancer each year. Anyone can get skin cancer, though the risk is greater if your parent, sibling or child has had a melanoma. A change in a mole can indicate a serious problem. If you notice that a mole becomes larger, changes color, is asymmetric or develops an irregular border, seek treatment right away. Other warning signs include itching, crusting, pain, and bleeding. Extensive and potentially disfiguring surgery can often be prevented by prompt biopsy and surgical removal of moles that are changing.

There are two kinds of skin tumors – benign (non-cancerous) and malignant (cancerous).
Cancerous skin tumors fall into one of three types:

Basal Cell Carcinoma
Basal Cell Carcinoma is the most common type of skin cancer. This type is rarely life threatening and does not spread. It can be inherited, but usually occurs in patients who have had repeated sun exposure. Patients that develop a Basal Cell cancer have a 60% chance of developing another one within five years.

Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Squamous Cell Carcinoma is another common type of skin cancer that is rarely life threatening. It is most often found in people with fair complexions. This type may develop from an Actinic (Solar) Keratosis, which is a scaly, crusty bump on sun-damaged skin. They can appear as a red bump, or may seem like an ulcer or a sore that won’t heal. They can range in size from a few millimeters to a few centimeters in diameter.

Malignant Melanoma
Malignant Melanoma is the least common but most serious form of skin cancer. It usually appears as a dark brown or black mole with uneven borders and irregular color, with shades of black/blue, red, or white. Melanoma most commonly occurs on the upper backs of men and women, as well as the lower legs of women. It can also develop on the face and other areas of the body. This cancer can arise from a mole that has been present for many years. Outcome is best if treated early.

When detected in its earliest stages, skin cancer is highly curable. It is important to have your skin examined regularly by a dermatologist.

Skin Cancer Treatment

Treatment for skin cancer varies according to the location, extent, aggressiveness of the cancer, and the patient’s general health. There are many treatment options available that include scraping and burning, freezing, lasers, radiation, routine excision, and surgery. Cancer cells must be completely removed or they can lead to regrowth and recurrence of the tumor.

Scraping And Burning: Scraping and burning (known as curettage and :), which involves scraping away the tumor, and then burning any remaining cancer cells. This is used for superficial basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma in situ -- cancers that have not progressed or moved out of the area in question. The doctor will also remove a bit of healthy tissue to prevent a recurrence.

Freezing: Freezing, or cryotherapy is used most often for pre-cancerous conditions such as actinic keratosis and for small basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas. For this treatment, the doctor applies liquid nitrogen to the tumor to freeze and kill the cells. This is often repeated a couple of times in the same office visit. After the dead area of skin thaws, it will swell, blister and crust over.

Laser Light: This approach uses a beam of laser light to vaporize cancer cells. It’s sometimes used for actinic keratosis, squamous cell carcinoma in situ (Bowen disease), and for very superficial basal cell carcinomas (those only on the surface of the skin). It’s not yet known if this type of treatment is as effective as standard methods of treatment, and it’s not widely used.

Photodynamic Therapy (PDT): PDT can be used to treat actinic keratoses. But its exact role in treating basal and squamous cell skin cancers, if any, still needs to be determined. This treatment uses a special liquid drug that is applied to the skin. The drug collects in the tumor cells over several hours or days, where it is converted to a different chemical that makes the cells very sensitive to certain types of light. A special light source is then focused on the tumor(s), which kills the cells.

Routine Excision: This is similar to an excisional biopsy (see Tests for Basal and Squamous Cell Skin Cancer), but in this case the diagnosis is already known. For this procedure, the skin is first numbed with a local anesthetic. The tumor is then cut out with a surgical knife, along with some surrounding normal skin. The remaining skin is carefully stitched back together, which will leave a scar.

Mohs Surgery (microscopically controlled surgery): The Mohs procedure involves removing skin cancer one layer at a time. The tissue and its surgical margins are examined under a microscope. This process continues until the margins are clear, meaning only cancer-free tissue around the tumor remains. Mohs has up to a 99 percent potential cure rate – the highest of all treatments for skin cancer.

Dr. Joel L. Lamm

Board Certified Dermatologist

516-933-1717

400 S. Oyster Bay Road
Hicksville, NY 11801

OFFICE OPENING BEGINNING MAY 18, 2020
Dr. Lamm will be available on Monday, Wednesday and Thursday afternoons.
Please call the office to schedule your appointment.
The receptionist will go over our safety procedures.

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p. 516-933-1717
f. 516-933-6851
info@lammdermatology.com

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